Call us:
+44 (0)207 870 1076

Email us:
jackie@foot-surgery.co.uk

THE UK'S FIRST AND MOST EXPERIENCED DEDICATED COSMETIC FOOT SURGERY CENTRE

Fillers for Feet

feet-fillers

 

Many patients have soreness and or callouses and corns on the ball of the foot. This can be due to wearing high fashionable shoes for long periods. Also after forty, the tissues that provide natural padding under the balls (joints) of the feet, can become thinned – called tissue atrophy. On the foot this can feel like walking on stones or marbles!

Sometime this can also be a side-effect of having steroid or hydrocortisone injections for other painful foot conditions.

In our practice we don’t like using silicone-type fillers but prefer to use more naturally derived products. It's temporary — six to nine months — but it helps with high-heel mules when you're putting a lot of weight on the ball of the foot. The injections provide internal padding for the feet at that point of pressure underneath the balls of the feet. Instead of using those silicon pads inside your shoes, this is an internal way of doing it. Plumping up your feet with injections is also cheaper and less risky than cut-into-the-foot surgery.

We therefore recommend Restylane injections. Restylane is a crystal clear gel that is injected under the skin in small amounts to restore volume and structure. It is based on hyaluronic acid, similar to the body's own hyaluronic acid that diminishes as we age.

The injections allow “plumping” and cushioning of the thinned tissues to alleviate the painful pressure. Injections may need to be repeated depending on the effectiveness, but no “foreign” material is left in the body, such as in the case of breast augmentation implants etc.

Restylane should not be used in or near areas where there is or has been skin disease, inflammation or skin-related problems. No skin test is required as Restylane does not contain any animal-derived ingredients.

 

fillers-for-feet

Warning:
For people experiencing a significant amount of pain standing in heels it could be a sign of partially dislocated bones or torn ligaments. This may require investigation and could lead to the need for more complex and invasive interventions such as surgery.

Please select your language

English French German Italian Portuguese Russian Spanish

Consultation Offer

We are offering free consultations from now through to the end of April.

> Please click here to enquire

Press Coverage

Radio Nottingham interview button

 

toe-shortening-sun

latest-news-dailymail

latest-news-womanmag

Call us: +44 (0)207 870 1076  Email us: jackie@foot-surgery.co.uk